HomeBLOGAir ConditionersHow Much Does It Cost To Run a Window Air Conditioner?

How Much Does It Cost To Run a Window Air Conditioner?

Most people find it challenging to keep up with rising electricity expenses. According to a government survey, the average American household spends more than $2,000 on energy bills, which is a significant amount given that the average yearly income of a US-based family is just over $60,000.

Because they utilize such a large percentage of your money, you’d naturally want to learn more about the causes that cause your monthly energy bills to rise. As a result, you should be well informed of the operating costs of your window air conditioner.

This guide will teach what you need to know about your window air conditioner to get to the bottom of how much it costs to operate each month.

Window air conditioners cost between $0.07 and $0.20 per hour to run on average. It’s crucial to note, however, that these are only averages. Cooling a single room for a few hours a day with a window air conditioner will cost substantially less. And it will cost a lot more to keep a 10,000-square-foot home cool all day and night.

How Much Does It Cost To Run A Window Air Conditioner?

It will cost you between $0.07 and $0.20 per hour for your Window air conditioners to run on average. Therefore, the BTU consumption and wattage determine the overall cost of running a window air conditioner and the number of hours utilized each day.

The table below illustrates the cost of running a window air conditioner with an average EER rating of 10 and an average power cost of $0.13 per kWh in the United States.

The total cost of your window AC unit will vary depending on the BTU, wattage, kWH, and hourly usage.

Estimated Cost Per Hour for a Window AC Unit (BTU)

$0.065 per hour for a 5,000 BTU window air conditioner

$0.085 per hour for an 8,000 BTU window air conditioner

$0.117 per hour for a 10,000 BTU window air conditioner

$0.143 per hour for a 12,000 BTU window air conditioner


How Much Does a Window Air Conditioner Cost Per Month?

How Much Does a Window Air Conditioner Cost Per Month?

The cost of running a window AC unit is typically between $15 and $40 per month. The BTU consumption and wattage determine the total monthly price of a window air conditioner and the number of hours operated each day.

Estimated Monthly Cost of a Window AC Unit (BTU)

$15.60 per month for a 5,000 BTU window air conditioner

$20.40 per month for an 8,000 BTU window air conditioner

$26.40 per month for a 10,000 BTU window air conditioner

$33.60 per month for a 12,000 BTU window air conditioner

5,000 BTU, 10,000 BTU, and 12,000 BTU are the most typical sizes for window air conditioners. These are the most significant bedroom air conditioners and small living room air conditioners.

The costs of running specific air conditioner sizes per hour and month are listed below.


How Much Does it Cost to Run a 5,000 BTU Air Conditioner?

The average cost of running a 5,000 BTU air conditioner is $0.065 per hour. If the air conditioner is turned on for 8 hours a day, it costs $0.52. It will cost roughly $15.60 to run the air conditioner for a month.

How Much Does it Cost to Run an 8,000 BTU Air Conditioner?

The average cost of running an 8,000 BTU air conditioner is $0.085 per hour. So, if the air conditioner is turned on for 8 hours every day, it will cost $0.68. each day, roughly $20.40 to run the air conditioner for a month.

How Much Does it Cost to Run a 10,000 BTU Air Conditioner?

The cost of running a 10,000 BTU air conditioner is $0.11 per hour on average. If the air conditioner is turned on for 8 hours a day, it costs $0.88. It will cost roughly $26.40 to run the air conditioner for a month.

How Much Does it Cost to Run a 12,000 BTU Air Conditioner?

Running a 12,000 BTU AC window unit costs $0.14 per hour. It costs $1.12 per day if the air conditioner is used for 8 hours. Therefore, it will cost roughly $33.60 to run the air conditioner for a month.


Calculating the Cost of Window Air Conditioner

Before you calculate the cost of ownership for a window air conditioner, you’ll need to know a few things:

  • The wattage of the air conditioner.
  • Your electric company’s kilowatts per hour (kWh) rate. (Nationally, the average is $0.13.)
  • The number of hours per day you wish to run the air conditioner.

Formula for calculating costs

1,000 x 0.13 (kWH) = hourly cost/charge of operation watts x 1 (hour of usage) watts x 1 (hour of use) watts x 1 (hour of use) watts x 1 (hour of use) watts

Example: 1,000 × 0.13 (kWH) x 500 watt unit x 1 hour = $0.065 hourly cost of operation

Daily cost of operation: $0.065 x 8 hours per day = $0.52


Window Air Conditioner Installation Cost

Window Air Conditioner Installation Cost

The average cost of installing a window air conditioner is $295. Installing a window air conditioner typically ranges from $138 to $500. Therefore, the average cost of a window air conditioner is $250, plus $60 to $200 for labor.

$295 is the national average.

$138 – $500 is a typical price range.

From $75 to $1,000, there’s something for everyone.

However, most people can install window air conditioners themselves, and each unit comes with all of the necessary accessories. So, if you’re ready to do it yourself, window AC installation can be free.

If you decide to engage a professional technician or handyman, you should budget $75 to $150 per hour for their services.


How Much Does A Window AC Unit Cost?

The good news is that you don’t have to go into debt to purchase a window air conditioner.

You won’t have to spend hundreds of dollars on a system or pay a specialist technician to install window air conditioners.

A window air conditioner costs between $138 and $500 on average.

The actual price is determined by various factors, which we’ll discuss next; nonetheless, cooling capacity and energy efficiency are the two most essential factors in choosing a higher price.


What Factors Affect The Price Of a Window Air Conditioner?

Before we look at the overall running cost of a window air conditioner, we think you’d like to learn more about the factors that influence it.

Cooling Capacity 

The cooling capacity of a window air conditioner, or the amount of space it can cool, is one of the most important elements impacting the pricing.

The larger the cooling capacity of a window air conditioner, the more energy it will require and the more expensive the device will be.

A window air conditioner’s cooling capacity can be determined by looking at its British Thermal Unit (BTU). This metric determines how successfully an appliance cools an area numerically.

The BTU values correspond to a specific square footage rating, which indicates how large of a room the air conditioner can cool.

The following are some examples of BTUs for window air conditioners:

BTU: 5,000 (150 sq. ft.)

BTU: 8,000 (350 sq. ft.)

BTU: 9,000 (400 sq. ft.)

BTU: 12,000 (550 sq. ft.)

BTU: 14,000 (700 sq. ft.)

Windows air conditioners with 14,000 BTUs are more potent than AC units with 5,000 BTUs and cost more.

Suppose your window air conditioner is the wrong size. In that case, you risk having a unit that isn’t powerful enough to chill the area or one that is far too powerful, causing your electricity bill to skyrocket unnecessarily.

Through-the-wall air conditioners, which look and perform very identically to window air conditioners but are installed into a wall rather than a window, follow the same principle.

Energy Efficiency 

It’s also known as the Energy Efficient Ratio (EER), which indicates how many watts your air conditioner uses to generate BTUs. EER indicates how efficient (or inefficient) your air conditioner is.

The lower the EER value listed on your window unit’s instruction manual, the higher your electricity expenses. For example, a standard EER of 10.0 is found in most air conditioners. Anything higher than this indicates a unit that is incredibly energy efficient.

Installation

Most window air conditioners are made to fit inside ordinary double-hung windows. Many versions, however, may be mounted inside a custom-built wall area using special mounting gear. This is a good alternative if your window’s measurements are too tiny or too huge or if you don’t have vertical sash windows.

Window ACs -Take exact measurements of the interior dimensions of the window frame, paying specific attention to the breadth. Then look in the AC’s specifications for the minimum and maximum window width parameters. Don’t panic if your model doesn’t extend to suit your window frame precisely. All window air conditioners come with installation kits that include side curtains to close any open area on either side of a window or wall opening.

Electrical Requirements

Because window air conditioners are more potent than other standard household equipment, double-check that your current electrical system can handle the unit’s electrical demands. For example, most room air conditioners are powered by 115, 125, or 220-volt circuits.

AC units with a cooling capacity of fewer than 15,000 BTUs are typically powered by normal domestic (115- to 125-volt) circuits.

220 volts: Window air conditioners with a cooling capacity greater than 15,000 BTUs are typically powered by 220-volt circuits. You may need to install particular electrical wiring or hire an HVAC professional to help you with specific devices.

The specifications will include electrical requirements such as voltage, amps, and watts

Maintenance

Window air conditioners need to be serviced regularly to stay in good working order. In addition, outside dirt and debris might gather inside or on the back, making them vulnerable. Furthermore, dust and particles will accumulate on the air filter of the air conditioner over time. All of these elements will eventually combine to degrade the efficacy of your air conditioner if left untreated.

Clean it thoroughly and efficiently at least once a year to maintain long-term operation. For example, it’s easy to access a window air conditioner with a slide-out chassis because all you need to do is slide the unit out. In addition, the majority of air filters may be cleaned with essential soap and water. Consult your owner’s handbook for specific maintenance instructions for your model.


How Much is a Window Air Conditioner in Total?

Window air conditioners range from $138 to $500, depending on the cooling capacity, energy efficiency, and unit amenities. Window air conditioners can also be operated for as little as $0.52 per day by the ordinary person.

So, the overall cost of a window air conditioner is determined by the quantity of use you expect from the unit.

Eight hours of air conditioning each day is a good average for most people. However, you may choose to utilize it differently depending on your season.


How Much is a Window Air Conditioner in Total?

People Also Ask

Is it cheaper to run window AC all the time?

First and foremost, sure, leaving your air conditioner on is more efficient. However, this does not imply what many people believe. By no means should you leave your air conditioner on full blast 24 hours a day, seven days a week?

The ideal strategy is to set your air conditioner to around 78 degrees (F) when not home. The Department of Energy recommends this number to achieve a nice mix between keeping your house comfortable and conserving energy.

Your air conditioner will not be operating all of the time if you set it to this setting. These machines work in cycles, releasing air 15-20 degrees cooler than the ambient temperature. After then, your thermostat will determine whether or not more processes are required to attain the temperature set on your thermostat. Because 78 degrees is a relatively warm setting, your air conditioner should quickly realize that no additional cycles are required.

When your home is occupied, a temperature of 68 degrees is recommended. That’s a 10-degree differential, which will necessitate further cycles. When you’re at home and need some fresh air, it’s worth it. When you’re not at home, though, that level of cooling isn’t required.

Use a Programmable Thermostat 

You’ll forget to turn your thermostat up a few degrees when you leave the house. Instead, install a programmable thermostat that takes care of everything for you to keep things simple. Because it works, this is one of the recommendations in our article on how to save money on electricity bills.

Non-programmable thermostat owners spend a lot of time fiddling with the settings to get them just perfect, which causes the equipment to malfunction. As a result, your air conditioner will persistently start and stop, causing extra wear and tear and shortening its lifespan.


How much electricity does a window AC use per hour?

Let’s pretend that the data tag on our air conditioner indicates it’s a 5000 BTUh unit with a SEER rating of 10. After an hour of operation, our air conditioner will provide 5000 BTUs of cooling.

Because SEER=10 indicates that 10 BTUs are used per Wh,

Our A/C unit will utilize 500 Watts per hour (5000 BTUh / 10 SEER).

We often use the following example (because the arithmetic is simple): say we have 125 days of the cooling season and run the air conditioner for eight hours every day.

Throughout a season, 8 x 125 = 1000 hours of cooling operation

500 watts per hour multiplied by 1000 hours per season is 500,000 watts per season.

So, per cooling season, we use 500,000 Watt Hours of energy (electricity). We multiply this by 1000 to translate to kilowatts, which is how our electricity bill will be expressed.

500 kWh (kilowatt-hours) per season of use = 500,000 Wh / 1000

During the cooling season, we need that much electricity.


Do window AC units use a lot of electricity?

A window air conditioner uses less than a third of the energy that a central air conditioner does. However, if you have more than one machine, the cost might quickly mount. In small places, window air conditioners make sense. However, installing central air is more cost-effective if you have a larger home or wish to chill multiple regions at once. 

A power consumption meter is a beneficial tool for the environmentally aware household to keep track of how much energy each device consumes. For example, the power of a window air conditioner is greater than that of most household equipment.

It’s critical that your electrical system can accommodate the new expansion. A small 115-volt window unit with a 15-amp demand can be used with conventional outlets. Larger equipment with 125 or 220 volts and more extensive amperage ratings, on the other hand, will require a dedicated outlet.


Conclusion

Keep in mind that while central air conditioners use SEER (Seasonal EER), window air conditioners utilize CEER. The higher and more outstanding the rating, the more efficient it is. You’ll pay less for the same quantity of cooling if the efficiency is higher.

Lastly, take note that the only exact answer is the one provided by your electric bill. And the best method to keep that figure low is to buy smart and follow the best-practice guidelines above.

RELATED ARTICLES
Subscribe
Notify of
guest

0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
- Advertisment -spot_img

Most Popular

LATEST BLOG POSTS

BTU SACC Vs. BTU ASHRAE In Portable AC Units

When choosing a portable air conditioner, you check various metrics, but the most important is capacity. Because you need to know how powerful is...